Articles Short Posts

Finding folds at the WSOP

Those who know my game well know I don’t particularly like to fold reasonably strong hands. While being a bit of a calling station works well against most good, aggressive players who almost always have at least some bluffs in their ranges, against weaker opponents who play blatantly straightforward and rarely bluff, calling down with good, but not amazing, hands can get you in a ton of trouble. This WSOP has provided me with numerous examples where I should simply lay down a hand to a weak, passive player that would be criminal to fold against someone with a balanced range.
The first example took place in a $1,500 WSOP event. The blinds were 25/25 and everyone had around 4,500 chips. I raised with Kc-Qd to 75 from middle position and both the small blind and big blind called. Both of my opponents were around 55 years old and had yet to take any sort of an aggressive betting line. The flop came Ks-Ts-6d. My opponents checked to me and I bet 150. Only the big blind called. The turn was the (Ks-Ts-6d)-2c. The small blind checked and I decided to bet 300 for value. To my surprise, he made it 1,000 with little thought. I reluctantly folded and he proudly showed me his Kh-Th.
While most good players could, and likely should, have flush draws and marginal made hands they decided to turn into bluffs in their range, a tight passive player is almost never bluffing. Knowing this, which hands would he realistically check raise large for value and, in his mind, protection? I imagine the worst hand he may think is a “premium” hand on this board would be K-J. If that is the worst possible hand he can have, K-Q is in awful shape. It is worth noting that you will occasionally fold the best hand but against his tight value range, K-Q is crushed. Even if he had a few premium draws in his range, K-Q still simply must be folded.  When your opponent’s range is almost entirely premium made hands, if you have a good, but not premium, made hand, you should usually fold.
Another hand came up a little while later in the same tournament. This time, the blinds were 150/300-25 with 15,000 effective stacks. A tight, passive player raised to 750 from the small blind and I elected to call in the big blind with Js-Tc. The flop came Jh-Jd-9h. My opponent bet 900 and I called. The turn was the (Jh-Jd-9h)-6c. He checked and I quickly tossed in 1,500, hoping to look as if I was trying to blatantly steal the pot. When he check raised to 4,000 with confidence, I assumed the way I put my chips in the pot induced him to run an optimistic bluff. I elected to call, hoping he would shove the river. The river was the (Jh-Jd-9h-6c)-8s. My opponent instantly went all-in for 9,000 and I called with little though, losing to his 6d-6s.
So, where did I go wrong? Some people may think I should have raised the flop for “protection” but if the opponent only has a few outs, you should not be concerned with getting outdrawn, especially if you suspect you will be able to extract an additional street of value later on the turn or river. I was also concerned that he would fold almost all hands worse than a 9 if I raised, which would be a disaster as I certainly want to keep him in the pot with various A and K high hands. Finally, I wasn’t entirely sure I could profitably get in 50 big blinds against this specific player if he elected to reraise on the flop.
I messed up badly on the turn. I thought he would view my splashy bet as a bluff whereas in reality, he probably wasn’t paying attention to how I put my chips in the pot in the least bit. If he had nothing, he would fold and if he had a good hand, he would call. It is as simple as that. I then compounded my error by assuming my opponent would lose his mind and attack my splashy bet, which he probably wasn’t even aware of. This made me think my opponent’s range consisted of almost entirely hands I crush. In reality, he simply has a J or better every time. When he instantly pushed on the nasty 8s river, which improved Q-T and J-8 to better hands, I should have found a fold because I lose to all value hands besides perhaps a vastly overplayed overpair. I leveled myself about as hard as possible.
I know that most players know to not pay off tight, passive players, but I seem to forget it from time to time. When someone who hasn’t put a chip in the pot in an aggressive manner all of a sudden wants to stick his whole stack in, you need an overly premium hand to continue. Don’t forget it.
If you are going to the WSOP, I strongly suggest you spend some time preparing. If you simply show up and expect to succeed, you are almost certain to fail. I recorded a six-hour long training series for you that explains all of the preparations I make in order to ensure I have the best chance to do well. I also discuss how to play with the wildly varying stacks you will be forced to play with at the WSOP. Check it out here: Jonathan Little’s WSOP Coaching Series
Thanks for reading and good luck in your games!
This article initially appeared in CardPlayer magazine.

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

888poker Articles Dominik Nitsche Kara Scott Sofia Lovgren vivian saliba

Home Game Heroes Get A Shot To Battle The 888poker Ambassadors

888poker is giving their players at shot at taking on their ambassadors including Vivian Saliba, Sofia Lovgren, and Dominik Nitsche.
Whether watching some of the biggest names in poker at the World Series of Poker, Poker After Dark or any other poker-related show, recreational poker players from all over the world have had the same thought on at least one occasion – “I’d love to test myself and battle against the pros.”
If this resonates and hits home, then take note that 888poker is giving all home game heroes and casual poker room players the chance to do just that – battle against the pros. It has never been easier to do so either, there’s no need to navigate a collection of satellite tournaments to get this opportunity. All you need to do is convince the 888poker team why you should be the one to play against the 888poker Ambassadors.

Three players will be selected to sit in an exclusive Six Max Sit & Go and battle it out against Dominik Nitsche, Sofia Lövgren, and Vivian Saliba. The winner will walk away with a $1,400 first-place prize while second place will add $600 to their bankroll.
Those that want to test their poker skills against their poker idols, go to the 888poker Facebook page and leave a comment. Entries need to be submitted no later than February 16 at 11 pm GMT to be considered. All selected players will be notified within three days and those winners will have a further 72 hours to confirm their seat at the table.
This competition also gives poker players another item that can be ticked off their poker bucket list – playing a live-streamed event. The tournament is being aired live on February 22 with World Series of Poker sideline reporter and current 888poker ambassador Kara Scott calling the action alongside veteran poker commentator David Tuchman.
Meet The 888poker Pros
The selected players will be up against tough opposition, competing against the trio of 888poker pros Vivian Saliba, Sofia Lövgren, and Dominik Nitsche. With almost $20 million in winnings between the three pros, the selected players will need to pull out all the stops to prove they’ve got what it takes to swim with the sharks.
Dominik Nitsche
With 4 WSOP bracelets, a World Poker Tour title, and over $18 million in tournament earnings, taking the scalp of the German national is definitely a story that would go down a storm at the local card room or home game. This of course will be no mean feat to pull off but running the right bluff or making the most hero of calls could be all it takes to take this poker titan down.
Vivian Saliba

Brazilian-born Saliba mainly cuts her cloth on the PLO streets but is no stranger or slouch to No Limit Hold’em either and can be often found streaming on Twitch under the username ViviSaliba. With 14 WSOP cashes and over $500k in prize money won, navigating past this pro will be harder than avoiding an Ace on the flop when holding pocket kings.
Sofia Lövgren

The third and final 888poker ambassador taking a seat at the table is Sofia Lövgren. One of the notable highlights in her poker career is a 12th place finish in the 2016 WSOP $1,500 No Limit Hold’em Millionaire Maker for $75,000. With over 7,000 entries into that tournament, Lövgren shows she’s got the patience and composure to wait for her spot and punish anyone who slips up.
What’s At Stake
The prizes up for grabs in this golden opportunity are nothing to roll your eyes at either, the winner of the Ambassadors Home Game will take home a tidy four-figure score of $1,400 with the runner-up winning a bankroll boosting $600.
Also, of note, while players may have plenty of reasons they think they should be considered – there’s a limit of only one submission per player.

หวยออนไลน์
เล่นหวยออนไลน์
ไพ่ออนไลน์
เว็บ คาสิโน
คาสิโน777

Articles

หาช่วงของพวกเขา (ทำอะไรกับมัน!)

ในหนังสือเล่มใหม่ของฉัน Excelling at No-Limit Hold’em มีเนื้อหาไม่กี่หน้าจาก 500 หน้าสำหรับการวิเคราะห์เชิงลึกของช่วง แม้ว่าผู้เล่นขั้นสูงสุดจะรู้วิธีที่จะทำให้คู่ต่อสู้อยู่ในหลาย ๆ มือ แต่ดูเหมือนว่ามีเพียงไม่กี่คนที่ออกมาและใช้ประโยชน์จากความสามารถในการประเมินช่วง ฉันเพิ่งเล่นงาน Borgata WPT มูลค่า 3,500 เหรียญทำให้แน่ใจว่าฉันรู้ว่าคู่ต่อสู้ของฉันเหยียดทั้งคู่ ปัญหาเดียวคือคู่ต่อสู้ของฉันทั้งคู่ไม่ได้ทำให้ฉันอารมณ์ไม่ดี ในการเริ่มต้นมือนี้ฉันมี 340,000 ระหว่าง 600 / 1,200-200 ฉันทุบโต๊ะและทำให้มันร้อน ในเวลานี้ชิปสแต็กเฉลี่ยอยู่ที่ประมาณ 90,000 ฉันคิดว่าฉันมีภาพที่ค่อนข้างหลวมแม้ว่าฉันจะทำการ์ดที่ดีก็จริง ผู้เล่นที่ใจเย็นและเฉยชาเขามี 170,000 คะแนนจากอันดับสอง เขากำลังกีดกันช่วงทั้งหมดของเขาด้วยมือที่หยาบกร้านที่ยอดเยี่ยม ในบางครั้งเขาจะงอแขนขาเมื่อเผชิญกับการโจมตี เมื่อรู้อย่างนั้นเมื่อฉันปลุก As-3c บนปุ่มฉันตัดสินใจทำ 3,500 ผมคาดว่าจะพับพรีฟล็อปหรือเรียกว่าพรีฟลอปแล้วโพสต์ฟล็อปจะเล่นได้ค่อนข้างตรงไปตรงมา ที่น่าแปลกใจคือชายวัยกลางคนที่แคบและก้าวร้าวเรียกคนตาบอดตัวเล็ก ๆ 150,000 คน เรียกอีกอย่างว่าความขี้เกียจเริ่มต้น Flop Ac-Ks-2d มาแล้ว ฝ่ายตรงข้ามมองมาที่ฉัน ณ จุดนี้คุณควรตระหนักว่ามันเป็นเรื่องยากมากที่จะได้รับคุณค่าที่ดีเยี่ยมจากมือของฉัน ในขณะเดียวกันถ้าฉันมองย้อนกลับไปที่ฟลอปและมีคนเดิมพันในเทิร์นและแม่น้ำฉันจะอยู่ผิดที่เพราะมือของฉันจะคว่ำลงในหม้อใบใหญ่ ดังนั้นฉันจึงตัดสินใจที่จะเดิมพัน 6,000 ในเงินกองกลาง 6,500 ถึง 13,500 เพื่อที่จะรับเงินกองกลางหรือเรียกด้วยมือที่แย่กว่า รู้ว่าถ้าฉันเดิมพันประมาณ 10,000 คู่ต่อสู้ของฉันจะดำเนินต่อไปเมื่อฉันถูกกดขี่เท่านั้น ด้วยการเดิมพัน 6,000 ฉันยอมให้ฝ่ายตรงข้ามเล่นต่อด้วยมือที่แย่กว่า เมื่อคุณมีไพ่ที่มีมูลค่าต่ำสิ่งสำคัญคือต้องทำการเดิมพันเพื่อให้คู่ต่อสู้อยู่ข้างหลัง ผู้เล่นที่ตาบอดต่ำเพิ่มขึ้นเป็น 12,000 คนและผู้เล่นอันดับ 2 คิดสักพักก่อนที่จะโทร ถึงตอนนี้ฉันคิดว่าคนตาบอดตัวเล็กมีมือที่แข็งแรงน่าจะเป็น AJ หรือดีกว่า ฉันไม่แน่ใจว่าเขากำลังปีนเขากับ AJ“ เพื่อค้นหาว่าเขาอยู่ที่ไหน” หรือด้วยมือที่ยอดเยี่ยมอย่าง A-2 พยายามหาเงินทั้งหมดเข้ามา ฉันรู้แค่ว่าเขามีบางอย่าง เขาคิดว่าเขาแข็งแกร่ง เมื่อพิจารณาจากสิ่งที่ฉันรู้เกี่ยวกับผู้เล่นอันดับ 2 ฉันคิดว่าเขาเป็นเอซในช่วงที่ดีที่สุดของเขาและเขาอาจจะเป็นมืออย่าง KQ รู้ว่ามีเอซที่ถูกนับอยู่แล้ว 3 เอซหนึ่งในมือของฉันอีกอันบนกระดานและอีกอันอาจอยู่ในมือของชายตาบอดตัวเล็ก ๆ เพราะมันค่อนข้างยากที่จะมีเอซเช่นกัน เมื่อรู้ว่าฉันถูกคู่ต่อสู้คนหนึ่งบดขยี้และอาจมีรูปร่างไม่ดีเมื่อเทียบกับอีกฝ่ายฉันควรทำอย่างไร? แม้ว่าจะดูเหมือนพับง่ายเพราะฉันอยู่ข้างหลัง แต่ฉันคิดว่ามันเป็นจุดที่ดีในการฟื้นตัว ฉันคิดว่าคนตัวเล็กจะเห็นการเรียกอันดับ 2 ที่แข็งแกร่งแม้ว่ามันจะอ่อนแอสำหรับฉันก็ตาม ฉันคิดว่าผู้เล่นอันดับ 2 จะต้องล้มลงแน่ ๆ ถ้าฉันไม่จับเขาอีกครั้งด้วยมือที่ยอดเยี่ยมเช่น 2-2 ในท้ายที่สุดฉันตัดสินใจที่จะเพิ่มเป็น 36,000 โปรดทราบว่าขนาดนี้ทำให้ฉันได้ราคาที่ดีในการบลัฟของฉันเนื่องจากคู่ต่อสู้บังคับให้ฉันเสี่ยงชิปจำนวนมากเพื่อที่ฉันจะได้อยู่ในมือ ผู้เล่นคนตาบอดคิดอยู่ตลอดเวลาก่อนที่เขาจะเริ่มพับและกระพริบ A ในกระบวนการ ผู้เล่นอันดับ 2 ก็คิดนิดนึง ในขณะที่เขากำลังคิดเกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้ฉันพยายามตัดสินใจว่าจะโทรหาเขาไหมถ้าเขาจะไปทั้งหมด มันฟังดูบ้ามากที่เล่นกับคู่บนสุดนักกีฬาล่าง 300 หม้อบิ๊กบลายด์ แต่เมื่อรู้ว่า A เป็นผู้นำฉันคิดว่าเขาอาจคิดว่าเขาสามารถเรียกมันว่าเป็นการผลักดันด้วยเอซชั้นหนึ่งหรือดีกว่า ในที่สุดเขาก็ตัดสินใจพับและบอกฉันว่าเขาเกือบจะผลักดันกับราชา ฉันตัดสินใจว่าจะโทรหาเขาถ้าฉันสามารถผลักดันเขาได้ดังนั้นฉันคิดว่ากระบวนการคิดของฉันเหมาะสมแล้ว ฉันคิดว่าผู้เล่นส่วนใหญ่ทุ่มพลัง A-3 เพราะพวกเขาคิดว่าพวกเขาพ่ายแพ้เมื่อพวกเขาขึ้นไปปัด แม้ว่าจะเป็นเรื่องดีที่จะมีมือที่ดีที่สุด แต่คุณจะพบว่ามันค่อนข้างยากที่จะชนะโดยเฉพาะในระดับกลางและระดับสูงหากคุณชนะเงินกองกลางในมือแม้ว่าคุณจะทำเงินได้มากกว่าเล็กน้อยด้วยมือใหญ่ก็ตาม มากกว่าฝ่ายตรงข้ามของคุณ เมื่อออกไปข้างนอกให้คิดถึงระยะของคู่ต่อสู้เสมอว่าเขามองเห็นระยะของคุณอย่างไรและเขาจะตอบสนองอย่างไรหากคุณอยู่ภายใต้ความกดดันอย่างรุนแรง คุณจะเห็นเกือบตลอดเวลาว่าถ้าฝ่ายตรงข้ามของคุณไม่ได้เป็นเจ้าของมือสองหรือมีเครื่องอ่านมือถือระดับโลกเขาจะหลีกทางและให้เงินกองกลางแก่คุณ ในครั้งต่อไปที่คุณกำลังเล่นให้พยายามหาสถานที่ที่ฝ่ายตรงข้ามไม่สามารถติดตามได้เมื่อต้องขึ้นเนิน โดยปกติเมื่อคุณคิดว่าพวกเขามีมือที่แข็งแกร่ง แต่ไม่น่าแปลกใจคุณสามารถวาดกระดานหนัก ๆ เช่น Ts-9d-7s หรือ 8c-7c-4d -Tc บนคู่ที่น่ากลัวหรือจับคู่กับมือปืนที่ดี เมื่อรู้ว่าคู่ต่อสู้ของคุณสามารถดัดได้บทละครเหล่านี้จะแสดงประสิทธิภาพที่ยอดเยี่ยม อย่างไรก็ตามคุณต้องระวัง หากคุณเรียกฝ่ายตรงข้ามว่าสถานีบทละครเหล่านี้จะเปลี่ยนแบ๊งค์ของคุณให้กลายเป็นกองขี้เถ้าอย่างรวดเร็ว เพื่อให้การวิเคราะห์ช่วงเป็นไปอย่างดีขอแนะนำให้คุณอ่านหนังสือผู้แต่งหลายคนเล่มใหม่ Excelling at No-Limit Hold’em มีบทอยู่สองสามบทในหนังสือเกี่ยวกับวิธีทำให้คู่ต่อสู้ของคุณอยู่ในตำแหน่งที่เฉพาะเจาะจงและสิ่งที่คุณสามารถทำได้เพื่อออกนอกเส้นและใช้ประโยชน์จากคู่ต่อสู้ของคุณ ฉันจะโฮสต์การสัมมนาผ่านเว็บฟรีจำนวนหนึ่งกับผู้เขียนที่น่าสนใจโดยเริ่มตั้งแต่ปลายปีนี้และสิ้นสุดในปี 2559 หากต้องการลงทะเบียนฟรีโปรดไปที่ HoldemBook.com .

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Long Posts Products

Fun hand from a $1/$2 live cash game

I was asked by a large number of my students to get some experience playing the small stakes live games so I could make a training product to help them crush those specific games. I did exactly that, and Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Cash Games was born. I owe a huge amount of thanks to everyone who inspired me to make this book! Thank you for making it the #1 Best-Selling Poker book on Amazon!
Today I am going to share a hand with you from a $1/$2 live cash game at Borgata, in Atlantic City. My table will populated with mostly 50-70 year old recreational players who liked to limp with almost their entire range of playable hands. When someone raised, it was usually to 6 big blinds, which typically resulted in everyone folding. Talk about a great game!
The lojack, hijack, and cutoff limped. I picked up Ah-Ts on the button and limped as well. Both raising and limping are fine options. I would typically raise in this spot but I was trying to get a feel for my opponents’ tendencies. The main reason limping is great is because it forces your opponents to stay in the pot with numerous worse A-x hands. Raising is ideal mainly when one or two people will call then play straightforwardly after the flop, allowing me to steal the pot when they have nothing while paying me off when we both flop top pair and I dominate them.
The player in the small blind, the only loose player at the table, a 30 year old Asian guy, raised to $7, which was quite abnormal. The big blind, lojack, hijack, and I called. I don’t particularly like his raise with any hand because when you are out of position, you generally want to play small pots. You certainly do not want to play a bloated pot versus four opponents with fairly wide ranges.
The flop came Ad-Kd-Qh, giving me top pair and a gutshot. Everyone checked to the cutoff, a 65 year old guy, who instantly went all-in for $45 into the $35 pot. He had made this move a few times during my first few orbits at the table but never got called. When you see someone making the same overly aggressive play over and over, you have to assume he has at least some bluffs or overvalued made hands in his range. However, he was 65 years old, so I folded with almost no thought. I also had to worry about the player in the small blind, who was clearly cutting out calling chips. This may sound quite tight, but I think I would fold K-Q and all worse made hands in this spot, reluctantly calling off with A-Q and better. If I thought the player in the small blind was certainly putting $45 in the pot, perhaps A-K should be folded. When you are against two likely premium ranges, you need almost the nuts to get involved.
That being said, the players in this game seemed to play fairly weak and passive before the flop but they almost never folded after the flop with any sort of decently strong made hand. I think most people at this table would have made the call with top pair plus a gutshot because they think top pair is “strong”. Just because your hand is reasonably strong on the hand ranking chart does not matter when you are against a range what is almost certainly premium made hands and premium draws. As expected, the player in the small blind decided to look up the cutoff and they both chopped the pot with the nut straight.
While I think my decision was fairly easy, both of my opponents played their hands horribly, assuming they think their opponents are capable of getting away from marginal made hands, as I did. After I folded, the small blind instantly put his stack in as if he could not wait to get his chips in the pot. Clearly this is a terrible idea because the lojack and cutoff still had their cards. When you have the nuts, the last thing you want to do is make your hand appear as if it is the nuts. This instant all-in move repeated itself over and over throughout my sessions, almost always with the fast bettor having the nuts. I can’t comprehend how they get action, but somehow they do. In these games, it seemed to me like most players were playing blatantly face-up. If you listen to what they tell you, you can steal the pot whenever they have nothing and make big folds when it is clear they want action.
If you would like to hear about many more of the significant pots I played at the $1/$2 tables in preparation for Strategies, check out this free 31-minute preview video of an exclusive webinar where I reveal more of the small cash game strategies I used that allowed me to win at $35 per hour.

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Long Posts

บังคับให้เก็บ?

โพสต์บล็อกนี้จะยาวและมีเทคนิคมากกว่าปกติ แต่ฉันสัญญา ผลตอบแทนที่ได้รับนั้นคุ้มค่าเพราะแนวคิดดังกล่าวสามารถยกระดับเกมของคุณได้ก็ต่อเมื่อคุณจะแก้ไขการรั่วไหล เมื่อเร็ว ๆ นี้ฉันกำลังชั่งใจว่าจะดีกว่าถ้าพยายามเริ่มต้นด้วย AA หรือพยายามให้คู่ต่อสู้อยู่ในเงินกองกลาง มีการเผยแพร่ในมือพวกเขาทั้งหมดมีประมาณ 10,000 ชิปใน 200/400 มีคนเพิ่มขึ้นถึง 1,000 คนจากจุดศูนย์กลางมีคนอื่นเรียกและฮีโร่แอคชั่นตาบอดตัวน้อยก้มตัวไปข้างหลังซึ่งมี AA ทางเลือกของเขาคือการเรียกมันว่าเป็นจริง ปีนค่อนข้างเล็กประมาณ 2,800 อาจกระตุ้นให้ทั้งสองฝ่ายเรียก; เพิ่มขึ้นประมาณ 3,600 อาจมีผู้โทรเพียงคนเดียว หรือเล่นแบบ all-in โดยปกติจะไม่ชนะเงินกองกลางโดยไม่มีการแข่งขัน หากคุณไม่ชอบคณิตศาสตร์ให้ไปที่ส่วนท้ายของบทความนี้เพื่อดูผลลัพธ์ อย่างไรก็ตามคณิตศาสตร์มีความสำคัญในโป๊กเกอร์ หากคุณต้องการมีความเชี่ยวชาญในโป๊กเกอร์เรียนรู้ที่จะเข้าใจคณิตศาสตร์พื้นฐาน เรียกได้ว่าเป็นการเล่นที่สนุกสนานเพราะอำพรางความแข็งแรงของมือคุณ แต่การปีนมักจะเป็นทางเลือกที่ดีกว่าเมื่อคุณมั่นใจได้ว่าการปีนที่ค่อนข้างใหญ่จะทำให้คู่ต่อสู้ของคุณอยู่ในหม้อได้ หากคุณโทรไปคุณจะไม่สามารถทำผิดพลาดในการเล่นพรีฟล็อปให้กับคู่ต่อสู้ของคุณได้เนื่องจากพวกเขาจะไม่ต้องเรียกเดิมพันเพิ่มเติมใด ๆ และคุณก็เตรียมพร้อมที่จะตกอยู่ในสถานการณ์ที่ยากลำบากเป็นครั้งคราวเมื่อคุณตรวจสอบฟล็อป และผู้เล่นคนอื่นเรียกหรือยก ดังที่กล่าวไว้การโทรนั้นมีข้อดีอยู่บ้าง แต่ความสามารถในการทำกำไรที่แน่นอนนั้นยากที่จะคำนวณโดยไม่รู้เกี่ยวกับฝ่ายค้านที่เฉพาะเจาะจงมากเกินไปดังนั้นฉันจะไม่สนใจตัวเลือกนี้ การไต่ขนาดเล็กประมาณ 2,800 มักจะส่งผลให้ฝ่ายตรงข้ามสองคนเรียกร้องเพราะพวกเขามีเงินกองกลางที่น่าดึงดูด คุณจะเห็นว่ามีคนเพียงไม่กี่คนที่วางชิป 1,000 ชิปและพับได้อีก 1,800 หากผู้เล่นทั้งสองฝ่ายเรียกเงินกองกลางจะมีไพ่ประมาณ 8,800 ใบเหลือประมาณ 7,200 กอง บนฟลอปคู่ต่อสู้ของคุณแต่ละคนจะปัดบางสิ่งที่นานพอที่จะดำเนินต่อไปได้โดยประมาณ 30% ของเวลาซึ่งประมาณ 50% ของเวลา ((% ที่หายไป) (% ที่หายไป) = .49) คู่ต่อสู้ทั้งสองของคุณจะล้มเหลว ทำตามสิ่งที่ดีพอ เมื่อฝ่ายตรงข้าม “โจมตี” คุณคุณจะมีส่วนแบ่งประมาณ 65% กับ AA ของคุณ แน่นอนว่าคุณจะมีอุปกรณ์ในการวาดน้ำหนักโต๊ะน้อยลงเล็กน้อยและแห้งกว่าเล็กน้อย แต่ฉันก็ทำได้ดีทีเดียว ดังนั้นคุณจะได้รับ 23,200 หม้อในกองของคุณและคุณเป็นเจ้าของ 65% ของมันดังนั้นมันจะให้สิ่งต่อไปนี้: .65 (23,200) = 15,080 – 10,000 = 5,080 ได้รับจำไว้ว่านี่คือประมาณ 50% ของสิ่งที่ใครบางคนทำได้ดีพอ เพื่อรับออลอิน โดยการเดิมพันอีก 50% ของเวลาที่ชนะติดต่อกันคุณจะได้รับ: 8800 – 2800 = 6000 ผลกำไรหากต้องการทราบมูลค่าโดยประมาณของการเล่นนี้เพียงแค่คูณเปอร์เซ็นต์ที่แต่ละสถานการณ์เกิดขึ้นนั่นคือ: .5 (5,080 ) + .5 (6,000) = 5,540 กำไรเป็นที่น่าสังเกตว่าฉันไม่ได้คำนึงถึงช่วงเวลาที่หายากที่ทำให้คู่ต่อสู้ทั้งสองสามารถก้าวไปข้างหน้าได้ดีพอ เมื่อคุณเลือกที่จะสูงถึง 3,600 คุณทำการคำนวณที่คล้ายกันคุณมักจะอยู่คนเดียวกับคู่ต่อสู้ซึ่งหมายความว่าคุณจะล้มเหลวมากพอที่จะดำเนินการต่อโดยใช้เวลา 30% นั่นคือคุณจะชนะเงินกองกลางด้วยการเดิมพันที่ตามมา 70% ของเวลาโดยให้สมการ: .3 (.65 (21,400) – 10,000) + .7 (8,600) – 3,600) = 4,673 กำไรหากคุณเลือกที่จะ All-in ก่อนฟล็อปเวลาที่คุณถูกเรียก ขึ้นอยู่กับการเปิดและช่วงการโทรของคู่ต่อสู้ของคุณ เพื่อความเรียบง่ายสมมติว่าผู้ยกเริ่มต้นยกมือขึ้น 28% และเรียกออลอินของคุณด้วยมือ 6% คุณจะมีส่วนแบ่งประมาณ 85% เมื่อเทียบกับช่วงการโทร ผู้เล่นที่เรียก Prefllop จะไม่ค่อยโทรหาคุณแบบ all-in ซึ่งแน่นอนว่าจะต้องได้รับรางวัลเพิ่มขึ้นก่อนที่จะล้มเหลวดังนั้นฉันจะไม่สนใจมัน ซึ่งหมายความว่าคุณชนะเงินกองกลางโดยไม่มีการแข่งขันประมาณ 80% เมื่อทุกคนพับและประมาณ 20% ของสิ่งที่คุณถูกเรียก สิ่งนี้จะให้สมการต่อไปนี้: .8 (2,600) + .2 (.85 (21,400) – 10,000) = 3,718 gain แน่นอนว่าหากลิฟท์เริ่มต้นเปิดช่องว่างที่แคบลงหรือหลวมขึ้นคุณควรปรับตัวเลขให้เหมาะสม ตัวอย่างเช่นหากคุณรู้ว่าเขายกมือเพียง 5% และคุณรู้ว่าเขาจะโทรหาทุกครั้งพรีฟล็อปออลอินจะมีกำไร 8,190 และถ้าเขาพับในแต่ละครั้งเขาจะแสดงกำไรเพียง 2,600 เท่านั้น ทั้งหมดนี้หมายความว่าอย่างไร? โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งกับ AA และส่วนใหญ่แล้วด้วยมือทั้งหมดที่จะอยู่ตรงหน้าคุณคุณจะรักษาคู่ต่อสู้ให้อยู่ในเงินกองกลางได้ดีกว่าการบังคับให้พวกเขาออกไป หากคุณกู้คืนบานเกล็ดขนาดใหญ่คุณต้องเสียค่าใช้จ่าย 2.5 บานประตูหน้าต่างขนาดใหญ่เมื่อเทียบกับเมื่อคุณยกบานเล็กการเพิ่มขนาดใหญ่หมายถึงหม้อที่มักจะถูกนำออกมาและการเพิ่มขนาดเล็กบ่อยๆคือหม้อสามทาง การเข้าไปในพวกเขาทั้งหมดโดยบังคับให้ทุกคนออกไปมักจะแย่กว่าการเข้าไปหาใครบางคนเว้นแต่คุณจะรู้ว่าการปีนครั้งแรกเปิดขึ้นโดยมีช่องว่างเล็กน้อย ผู้เล่นมือสมัครเล่นส่วนใหญ่ได้รับการบอกอย่างผิด ๆ ว่าเมื่อพวกเขามีมือที่ดีที่สุดพวกเขาควรปีนให้สูงโดยหวังว่าจะบังคับให้คู่ต่อสู้ออกจากเงินกองกลาง ในความเป็นจริงตรงกันข้าม คุณได้รับเงินจากการได้รับมูลค่าโดยไม่ต้องทิ้งลงถังขยะ ในขณะที่ม่านบังตาขนาดใหญ่ 2.5 อาจดูเหมือนไม่ใช่เรื่องใหญ่ แต่คุณควรตระหนักว่าผู้เล่นทั่วโลกคาดหวังว่าจะชนะประมาณ 10 บลายด์ต่อ 100 มือ เนื่องจากคุณได้รับ AA ทุกๆ 221 มือหากคุณพยายามยกหัวของคุณแทนที่จะพยายามเก็บหม้อในหลาย ๆ ทางคุณจะเสียผ้าม่านขนาดใหญ่ประมาณ 1.2 ชิ้นจากอัตราที่คุณได้รับ รู้ว่าถ้าคุณทำผิดพลาดคุณอาจจะทำเช่นเดียวกันกับ KK, QQ, JJ และ AK ฉันคิดว่าความผิดพลาดนี้เพียงอย่างเดียวทำให้ผู้เล่นเดิมพันต่ำจำนวนมากอยู่ในเกมที่มีเดิมพันต่ำ พวกเขาอาจจะได้รับมู่ลี่ขนาดใหญ่ประมาณ 4 อันต่อ 100 มือซึ่งหักหลังจากคราด เนื่องจากการหลบหนีนี้ทำให้พวกเขากลายเป็นผู้แพ้ ฉันคิดว่าเหตุผลที่ผู้เล่นมือสมัครเล่นส่วนใหญ่กลัวที่จะเห็นความล้มเหลวของ AA เป็นเพราะพวกเขาดูหมิ่นที่จะถูกน็อค พวกเขาค่อนข้างจะทิ้งส่วนของผู้ถือหุ้นจำนวนมากแทนที่จะใช้เวลาเพียงเล็กน้อย ปัญหาที่แท้จริงของคนส่วนใหญ่คือพวกเขาเชื่อมโยงการสูญเสียกับความรู้สึกแย่ ๆ และการชนะด้วยความรู้สึกดี หากคุณต้องการเป็นผู้เล่นเกมที่ชนะกับผู้ที่พยายามเอาชนะคุณจำเป็นต้องเชื่อมโยงการเพิ่มความเสมอภาคกับความรู้สึกที่ดีและการสูญเสียความเท่าเทียมกับความรู้สึกแย่ ๆ ที่กล่าวว่าฉันพยายามที่จะไม่รู้สึกใด ๆ ที่โต๊ะ ฉันบันทึกมือของฉันและผ่านกระบวนการ “ความรู้สึก” บนโต๊ะเมื่อฉันทบทวนการเล่นของฉัน ผลที่แท้จริงของมือชนะหรือแพ้ไม่ควรเกี่ยวข้องกับจิตใจโดยสิ้นเชิง คำถามที่แท้จริงคือคุ้มค่าหรือไม่ที่จะทำลายโอกาสที่จะชนะในโป๊กเกอร์เพื่อหลีกเลี่ยงการติดอยู่ในมือระดับพรีเมียมในบางครั้ง โดยส่วนตัวแล้วฉันอยากจะชนะในโป๊กเกอร์แม้ว่ามันจะ “รู้สึกแย่” ในช่วงเวลาพิเศษเล็กน้อยก็ตาม หากคุณต้องการทราบข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมเกี่ยวกับกลยุทธ์การหาเงินแบบสดของฉันซึ่งทำให้ฉันสามารถชนะในเกมที่มีส่วนร่วมระดับปานกลางและสูงอย่างต่อเนื่องในช่วง 10 ปีที่ผ่านมาฉันขอแนะนำให้คุณอ่านหนังสือย่อส่วนบนเว็บนี้ฉันจะพูดถึงแนวคิดหลักหลายประการ หากคุณศึกษาการสัมมนาผ่านเว็บพิเศษนี้อย่างขยันขันแข็งคุณอาจจะเป็นผู้เล่นที่ดีที่สุดในการเล่นด้วยเงินที่คุณเล่น อย่าลืมดูอีกครั้งในสัปดาห์หน้าเพื่อรับโพสต์ใหม่ในบล็อกการศึกษา! .

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Long Posts

Should you ever fold pocket Kings preflop?

I don’t usually write about spots that come up infrequently but recently I witnessed this hand I thought was uniquely instructive. Everyone started with about 150 big blinds. Player A in 1st position raised to 3 big blinds, Player B, a good tight aggressive kid in 2nd position, reraised to 8 big blinds and Player C, a mediocre loose aggressive kid in 3rd position, 4-bet to 22 big blinds. Player A folded then Player B 5-bet to 42 big blinds. Player C elected to 6-bet to 68 big blinds only to watch as Player B decided to go all-in. Fun stuff! Player C, who was currently getting 3.7:1 pot odds, meaning he needs to win 27% of the time, proudly flipped his K-K face up and folded.
While I am all for making big folds when they make sense, in this situation, even though Player B will have A-A a huge amount of the time, folding K-K is a fairly large error unless you know for a fact that Player B will only go all-in with A-A. The problem with this hand is that Player B is certainly aware that Player C is a loose aggressive player. Because of this, Player B could easily have a wider range than only A-A.
Suppose Player B’s range is A-A and K-K. Notice there is only one combination of K-K remaining, meaning he will have A-A 86% of the time and K-K 14% of the time. Player C will win the hand 22% of the time, making a call an error as he needs to win 27% of the time to break even. If Player B would go all-in with A-A, K-K and Q-Q, Player C would win 50% of the time. If Player B would push with A-A, K-K, Q-Q and A-K, Player C would win 57% of the time. If Player B is ever bluffing, Player C’s equity skyrockets.
The way I look at these situations, especially when I do not know my opponent’s exact range, is to average the ranges I think make sense. I imagine the equation for calculating Player C’s equity in this spot looks something like this:
EV = .3(.18) + .4(.22) + .2(.5) + .1(.57) = 30%
Clearly I do not do this math at the table. I have studied the game away from the table enough to know how this situation typically looks and how to react if I am ever in this spot. What this equation represents is 30% of the time Player B will have A-A, 40% of the time he will have A-A or K-K, 20% of the time he will have A-A, K-K or Q-Q, and 10% of the time he will have A-A, K-K, Q-Q or A-K.  Given the numbers, it would be a small error to fold as Player C will win 30% of the time, on average, and he needs to win 27% of the time to break even. Since 30% is larger than 27%, he should call.
As always, one simple equation is not the end of the story. Notice I did not add any total bluffs to Player B’s range. If Player B is bluffing around 10% of the time and he has A-A 10% less often, Player C’s equity jumps to 35%, making a fold a clear error. However, there is always value in surviving in a tournament, especially if you think you are much better than your opponents. Assuming Player C is good, which he obviously isn’t because he folded K-K face up, he should lean toward folding, especially if he thinks the situation is nearly break even. If Player C is a bad player, significantly worse than his opponents, he should actually be much more prone to call as he can get all of his money in with around neutral equity, which is probably much better than he will do later in the tournament.
In my opinion, Player C made a large error by 5-betting to 22 big blinds. If he called, he could take a flop and likely see a somewhat cheap showdown. While he would still lose a large pot if his opponent had A-A, he would force his opponent to take a flop with all of his worse hands as well. Assuming you are a good player, you rarely want to get all-in preflop when extremely deep stacked. You are much better off winning lots of small pots, slowly grinding up your stack. By putting in the 5-bet, Player C set himself up for failure if Player B decided to go all-in.
As Player B mucked, he flashed his As-3s. I liked it.
If you want to learn more about my tournament strategy that has allowed me to win in the highest buy-in games over the last 10 years, check out this exclusive webinar where I reveal my complete tournament strategy. If you follow the advice I present in this 2 hour 45 minute training course, I am confident you will be one of the best players in any tournament you enter.
Be sure to check back next week for another educational blog post! Thanks for reading and good luck in your games!
 
 

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Short Posts

Tough hand from EPT Malta

In one word, my trip to the 2015 European Poker Tour series in Malta was “brutal”. In almost every event, I doubled up in the first two hours only to either get unlucky in a huge pot or go super card dead, eventually busting near the end of the first day. This lead to me having zero cashes in the eight events I entered. Despite the abysmal results, I am very happy with how I played and focused throughout the trip. I realize that if I ran a bit better, the trip would have been an amazing success. For example, I lost with KK versus AK in the €5,300 main event for a three times average pot in the middle of day two. Had I won that hand, I would have almost certainly cashed and made a deep run. Poker is tough sometimes! I made a video blog discussing my thought process and a few of the interesting hands, which you can watch using this link. Let me know what you think!
Today I am going to share with you a tough hand from the €10,300 high roller event. This hand took place early in day 1. The blinds were 100/200 with a 25 ante. Everyone folded to me in the small blind. I looked down at Kc-9h. Theo Jorgensen, a well-respected high stakes pro, was in the big blind. We both had 50,000 (250 BB) stacks.
When I am in the small blind and a good player who knows how to abuse position is in the big blind, I tend to limp with most of my playable range. This is because if I raise and he calls, I will be playing from out of position against a range that will be nearly impossible to read (some players defend somewhat tightly and others defend with 100% of hands). If I raise and he reraises, I will be in a tough spot, playing a bloated pot out of position with a hand that will usually flop top or middle pair with a marginal kicker. If I raise and he folds, it means he had absolute trash. Instead, if I limp, I can easily call any reasonable raise with a large portion of my range, allowing me to see a flop for a cheap price. If he checks behind, that is also fine. So, I limped. Theo raised to 600 and I called. I do not think limp-reraising has any merit as my hand is not strong enough to pile a huge amount of chips into the pot from out of position, especially when I am unsure about the strength of Theo’s range.
The flop came Qh-Jh-Tc, giving me a straight. This is certainly an acceptable flop! I thought Theo would bet almost all of his range that was not a marginal made hand, such as J-2 or T-8, or a marginal draw, such as K-4 or 9-6. I thought he would bet top pair or better for value and his unpaired hands as bluffs, given this board should be significantly better for his range than mine. I assumed he would bet all of his strong draws. I do not think leading has much merit because if Theo has something decent, leading will save him a lot of money compared to if I get to check-raise, which was my plan. So, I checked. Unfortunately, he checked behind.
The turn was the (Qh-Jh-Tc)-3h. Even though a flush is now possible, my hand is still great. I imagine I have the best hand almost every time in this situation, because most players would bet the flop with a flush draw. Seeing how I thought Theo’s range was mostly marginal made hands and marginal draws, I thought betting was the only play that made sense. I assumed that if he had a marginal hand and I checked, he would either continue checking or bet but then fold to my check-raise. So, I bet 1,000 into the 1,425 pot and he called.
The river was the (Qh-Jh-Tc-3h)-7h. While my straight improved to a flush, my hand was now far from the nuts. It is important to realize that just because my hand moved up the hand ranking chart does not mean it improved in relation to my opponent’s hand. In reality, any heart on the river is quite bad for me because I only have a marginal bluff catcher with my marginal flush. When you have a bluff catcher, betting is usually a horrible idea, especially against a strong opponent. So, I checked and Theo bet 3,000 into the 3,425 pot.
This is a difficult spot because I had no clue if he would only make this bet with strong flushes or if he would bet with both strong flushes and total bluffs. Since I knew he was a well-respected pro, I decided he simply must be good enough to bet the effective nuts and total bluffs. I made the call and was shown the nuts, Ah-Qd.
Even though I lost this hand, I am perfectly happy with the way I played it. Notice that just because Theo had the nuts this time does not mean my call was a “mistake”. If we played this hand 100 times and he showed the nuts or the near nuts almost every time, then my call would be horrible, but that simply isn’t how poker works. Most likely, my call was either barely profitable or barely unprofitable. When you run into spots like this over and over in a short span of time, you are going to have a tough series. Hopefully I run a bit hotter at the next tournament stop.
If you want to learn more about how I think during poker tournaments , I made an exclusive webinar explaining everything I do that has allowed me to win year after year. If you are interested in taking your poker game to the next level, click here. 
Be sure to check back next week for another educational blog post. Thanks for reading!

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Short Posts

Should you go pro?

Every time I do a webinar where members of my training site, FloatTheTurn.com, can log in and ask me questions, I find myself answering one specific question: “When should I become a professional poker player?” To hopefully avoid re-answering the same question again in the future, here are my thoughts on the subject.
Let’s assume you play $2-$5 no-limit hold’em at a local card room, which is about the stakes most people play who ask the question. The reason this is the general stake is because it’s the highest level played at most local card rooms and most players who can beat this game feel like they are decently good at poker. Let’s assume you make $50 per hour. When I played $5-$10 at Bellagio five years ago, over the course of a summer playing about 50 hours per week, I made around $100 per hour. Since $2-$5 is half the size of $5-$10, we can assume $50 per hour is a decent, sustainable win rate (although it could be less in today’s environment). So, if you play 40 hours per week, you will make around $8,000 per month, which sounds great.
There are a few problems with this nice $96,000 per year salary. First, no one wants to play 40 hours per week. I found myself constantly wanting to take days off or cut sessions short because I simply didn’t enjoy sitting at the table for that many hours. Also, most players feel a desire to take time off when they are either winning or losing more often than expected. Because of this, you will probably only be able to average 30 hours per week. We’re now looking at $72,000 salary.
Next, you have to pay taxes. Assuming you pay your full 20 percent or so, you’ll actually bring home $57,600, which still isn’t too shabby. You’ll probably need to buy health insurance, which will cost around $250 per month, reducing your disposable income to $54,600 a year. While this doesn’t sound bad, you also need to set aside money for retirement, which will set you back around $10,000 per year, though you’ll eventually get that back at some point. You’ll be left with about $45,000 per year to live on while trying to grow your bankroll.
It should be noted that it is suicide to try to become a professional without at least a year’s worth of living expenses set aside and a nice bankroll, at least 5,000 big blinds for No-Limit Hold’em cash games. So, if you spend $3,000 per month, you need at least $61,000 before even considering becoming a $2/$5 pro.
There are numerous factors that should influence your decision to become a professional player. If you have a family, your expenses will be much more than a single person and will probably increase as time goes forward, especially if you have young children. You’ll also find it hard to justify putting in numerous hours at the table while you miss your child growing up. This will often result in playing during non-peak hours, which will dramatically cut your win rate. If you currently have a “normal” job that pays well, you’ll also have a tough time justifying the move to poker. If you make $40 per hour at your job, which provides a nice, secure paycheck, there is really no reason to rely on poker, even if your actual hourly rate may be slightly higher. There is a lot of value in having no variance to your monthly income.
One thing most players don’t consider when going pro is you may not be as good as you think you are. If you don’t have a long track record of winning, you shouldn’t even consider quitting your job. I would estimate that you need at least a 500 hour sample in the game you plan on playing before attempting to go pro. These 500 hours will also have let you grind up an adequate bankroll for the game. Ideally, this trial period will let you know what your win rate it is. I also suggest you diligently study my in-depth book, Jonathan Little on Live No-Limit Cash Games.
You may find you enjoy poker as a hobby and not a job. I suggest taking some vacation time away from your job and playing poker as you would if you were a professional, before actually quitting your job. Hopefully, this will let you know what it feels like to play poker every day. Playing poker professionally requires a drastically different mindset compared to playing recreationally.
You may have noticed that I did not mention becoming a professional tournament player. This is because, for the most part, it is quite difficult to put in enough time at the table necessary to give you a steady sizable return. Also, small stakes tournaments in most local casinos are not profitable due to poor structures and high rake. For example, if you can play a $200 buy-in + $30 rake tournament at your casino every day that has a relatively fast structure, you may win something like $50 per game. If each tournament takes 4 hours, you will win $5 per hour ($50 per game – $30 rake). Even if your tournament is incredibly soft, you may win at the rate of $20 per hour, which is about as much as a great player will win at $1/$2 cash games. Notice that putting in 4 hours per day playing a tournament with a win rate of $20 per hour will not make you rich anytime soon. Since most casinos don’t have daily $500 buy-in or larger tournaments, I suggest you devote your time to cash games when you are initially considering going pro. Playing tournaments only becomes a reasonable idea when the buy-ins become very large, assuming the fields are still soft, because then, you can expect to have a high hourly rate.
In the end, if someone hates their 9-to-5 job and wants to play poker, they are probably going to try going pro. Do your best to make sure the decision is the correct one because if you’re wrong, you may squander a lot of time, as well as your bankroll. If you decide to make the leap, let me know!
To further illustrate the dedication you must have to the game if you want to succeed, I suggest you check out the Going Pro series I recorded with one of my best students, OneTimeJoker. He came to me a few years ago asking to be coached. It was clear to me that he had the drive and passion to become great. We recorded every one of our training sessions, which you can check out here.
Thanks for reading. Be sure to check back next week for another educational blog post.
 

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Short Posts

3 steps to improve your poker skills by reviewing your play

It is well known that if you are not constantly improving your poker skills, you are falling behind. In this blog post., I will share with you 3 steps you can follow that will immediately help you improve your poker skills.
Step 1:
Record your play.
You can do this in live poker by carrying around a notebook and writing down all relevant and interesting hands you play. I make a point to write down every single hand I play in major live poker tournaments any time the hand consists of more than a raise and continuation bet. This leads to a lot of writing but once you get used to it, it will become second nature. I also make a point to note my opponents’ tendencies so I know which adjustments I should make. Be sure to write down your hand, the effective stack, the blinds and your position as well as all of your opponents’ actions. Writing down “I had A-Q, he raised, I reraised, he went all-in, I called and lost to A-J” will not be useful to learning as you are missing numerous important details.
Online, you can download various poker tracking programs, such as Hold’em Manager, to record your hands and your results. This makes for extraordinarily simple hand reviewing, making your job much easier.
Step 2:
Review your play.
In order to discover your mistakes, you must review your hands after you have played them with a clear mindset. Quite often, you will not be thinking soundly at the poker table which will cause you to make errors. Very few people commit major blunders at the poker table on purpose.  After you are finished playing and are no longer actively involved in the game, you should review your hands and think about all of your possible decisions. Try to figure out if the outcome could have been better if you played the key hands differently.
You must realize that quite often, when you bust or lose a large pot, you did nothing wrong. Some players think that if they get A-K all-in and lose against their opponent’s Q-Q, they made a mistake. Most of the time, that situation is unavoidable. You should not be worried about the fairly standard spots and bad beats where everyone goes broke. You have to be concerned with the situation where some people go broke and others do not.
For example, one situation where amateur players go broke frequently when professionals do not is when both players have top pair but you have the worst kicker. Amateur players typically raise and reraise the flop only to find out they are crushed when all the money goes in. Professionals call their opponent’s continuation bet on the flop and then evaluate the bets on the later streets, electing to either fold or call down, losing a small pot. Sometimes what appears to be a standard set up is easily avoidable.
I suggest you not only review the large hands you lose but also the somewhat mundane pots. Quite often, players will discover they are butchering a standard situation that comes up frequently, such as not continuation betting enough or always calling with a draw on the flop instead of occasionally raising. Make a point to review all of your play. You must understand this will not be a quick process. I would estimate I spend about an hour per day reviewing my play. I suspect most players would be much better off if they study and review their play an amount of time equal to the amount of time they actually spend at the poker table.
I also suggest you find a group of peers to review your hands with. You will find that discussing concepts with other players will help all of you grow as poker players much faster than if you only study alone. If you want to post hands for me and other players to review, check out the forums at FloatTheTurn.com.
Step 3:
Recognize your flaws.
Once you have figured out what you are doing incorrectly, you must make a point to not commit the same errors in the future. It can be quite difficult to force yourself to change your default playing style once it has become ingrained into your mind. You must realize that every time you make an error, you are giving your hard earned money to someone else. Since most people want to hold on to their money, this should be motivation enough to improve. To help me focus on correcting my leaks, I carry around a list that outlines them.
For example, I tend to not give players enough credit when they are willing to put a lot of money in the pot in an overly aggressive manner. While I think their play is only good as a bluff, because why else would you put in so much money that their opponent must have a premium hand to call, they are putting their stack in because they are afraid of getting outdrawn. Once you know your leaks, you can constantly think about them and recognize the situations you typically mess up before they occur, allowing you to make the correct decision in the heat of battle.
I hope this blog post helps motivate you to take your game to the next level. Becoming excellent at poker demands a lot of hard work and dedication. If you have any questions about this process, feel free to ask in the comments section below or on twitter @JonathanLittle. Thanks for reading!

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง

Articles Short Posts

Learning to think outside the box

If you ever hope to become an excellent poker player, you must embrace the fact that you do not know the answers to numerous questions that constantly come up in poker. If you do not know something, as an active, engaged learner striving to improve your game, you should try your best to find the answer.
Most people simply read articles, books and poker forums, hoping to stumble upon the answers. While this is a reasonable initial step, it will not take you too far. In order to actually improve, you must find a group of like-minded peers who genuinely want to discuss your thoughts and questions. You should also hire a poker coach who can give you concrete answers to your problems. Once you figure out how excellent poker players tackle a problem, you should be able to notice where you lack knowledge and also learn how to figure out the answer. What makes an excellent poker player is not someone who thinks they know everything, but someone who has a broad base of knowledge coupled with the ability to solve almost any problem they encounter.
While it is true that the knowledge base in poker is constantly growing at a startling rate as we discover more about topics ranging from optimal strategy to exploiting specific player types to psychology, if we are practicing conscious ignorance, we also learn what we do not know. The absolute best players are constantly challenging even the most basic assumptions about the game and improving at a much faster rate than their peers.
Take, for instance, the simple act of figuring out how much to raise before the flop when the action folds to you before the flop with a 50 big blind stack in the middle levels of a poker tournament against reasonable competition. As far as I know, the initial open raises of the 1970’s tended to be between 3 and 5 big blinds. Players eventually adopted the assumption that raising to 3 big blinds before the flop was both standard and good. I know this to be the case because when I first started playing poker, every book I read said, as if it was a fact, that any raise size before the flop other than to 3 big blinds was suboptimal. In today’s game, most world class players raise to between 2 and 2.25 big blinds, although they mix it up based on the effective stack size and opponent tendencies.
How and why did this change occur? What probably happened was the best players realized they could raise with a wider range with the intention of folding to any sort of aggression from their overly tight, passive opponents if they raised to a smaller amount. They also noticed that if they minraised, they would induce more calls from the players in the blinds, which is an excellent result, as taking a flop in position against an opponent’s  wide range is a favorable situation to be in.
While the best players in the world tend to be innovators, everyone else simply follows the leaders. A few years ago, I noticed the biggest winners online minraising as their standard opening raise once the stacks became somewhat shallow. Sadly, I was a touch slow to adopt this adjustment. Once I experimented with a bit, I realized how this simple adjustment can instantly raise your win rate as well as force you to learn how to play well after the flop.
While I like to think of myself as an innovator in today’s game, I still look to my peers for inspiration. Current strategic adjustments you will likely see in the near future, if you haven’t already encountered them, are smaller 3bet and 4bet sizes, which in turn will result in smaller bets on the flop and turn. These small postflop bets will lead to both smaller and larger river bets with wider ranges than you are probably used to seeing. I suspect you will soon begin to see many players leading into the preflop raiser, both in single-raised and reraised pots. You will also see a greater awareness of the psychological aspects of poker.
Dr. Patricia Cardner and I recently wrote Positive Poker: A Modern Psychological Approach to Mastering your Mental Game, which I think will become a classic in poker literature. Ten years ago, I was totally ignorant of the fact that being in shape and staying mentally sharp could help my poker game. I was an overweight kid who sat in a chair and played online poker all day. I don’t quite know how mental and physical fitness got on my radar, but once they did, my life totally changed for the better. I am now in great shape and can think clearly for many more hours than before. I imagine many poker players are still oblivious to the fact that many aspects of poker take place beyond the felt.
Dr. Cardner and I will be sharing with our students many skills that must mastered if you want to have a strong mental game in a FREE upcoming webinar on 4/25/2016 at 7pm EST, which you can sign up for here.
Once you know how to go about figuring out what you do not know, you will be well on your way to becoming an excellent poker player. I suggest you push the boundaries and do not accept conventional wisdom as the undeniable truth. As your skills and knowledge base improve, make a point to look further and see which questions remain unanswered. You will likely find that the more you know, the more you don’t know.
I hope you enjoyed this article. If you did, please share it with your friends. Also be sure to sign up for the FREE webinar Dr. Cardner and I will be hosting on 4/25. I’ll be back next week with another educational blog post. Thanks for reading!

.

เกมส์ยิ่งปลา คาสิโน ฟรีเครดิต
ฟรีเครดิตทดลองเล่น คาสิโน
เกมส์ คาสิโน ออนไลน์
บ่อนออนไลน์
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ได้เงินจริง